Protecting the Right to Enjoy Doping-Free Sport

News

Athlete banned following Pre-Games test

England weightlifter Denis Catana did not compete in the Commonwealth Games following an anti-doping rule violation

England weightlifter Denis Catana did not compete in the Commonwealth Games following an anti-doping rule violation
(Credit: Getty Images)

UK Anti-Doping has today confirmed that England weightlifter Denis Catana has been suspended from all competition for two years following an anti-doping rule violation.

Catana tested positive for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Metenolone in August 2010 as part of UK Anti-Doping’s pre-Commonwealth Games testing programme and was provisionally suspended from all competition, including the 2010 Commonwealth Games in Delhi.

The athlete was charged by UK Anti-Doping on 30 November 2010 and a period of ineligibility of two years was imposed, running from 21 September 2010 to 20 September 2012. The full written decision can be found at http://www.ukad.org.uk/anti-doping-rule-violations/current-violations/.

UK Anti-Doping operates pre-games testing programmes before every major event. Complementing its existing education and anti-doping programmes, this programme is designed to provide confidence that only a clean team enters competition.

UK Anti-Doping Director of Operations Nicole Sapstead said:  “Mr Catana was tested as part of UK Anti-Doping’s Pre-Commonwealth Games testing programme. This case shows the importance of our major event programme, and our commitment to stopping athletes who dope competing on the world stage.

“Here in the UK, our anti-doping programme places great emphasis on targeting athletes out-of-competition, reflecting the recent comments of Bob Weiner. We run an intelligence-led anti-doping programme aimed at catching doping athletes before they are able to compete and we will continue to work tirelessly to protect the rights of clean athletes in the run up to London 2012 and beyond.

“As this case demonstrates, athletes choosing to dope are likely to be caught and are likely to face exclusion from competition at all levels.”
 

Back